Maine Lead Paint News

Maine Lead Paint News

We do our best to keep on top of the most recent developments in lead paint issues. Check here for the latest news!


Toddler’s lead poison scare turns Phish family into accidental activists

Jon and Briar Fishman tried to do all the right things when they moved their growing family from Vermont to a 200-year-old farmhouse in Lincolnville in 2006.

 

Picture of Kristy Scamman's three year old son, Cooper.

'It's like the lead attacked anything that was good:' Mother shares son's story of lead poisoning

A Saco mother said Tuesday that her son's impaired cognitive functioning is a result of lead poisoning he sustained at 18 months old.

 

Bettyann Sheats stands in one of her apartment buildings in Lewiston, in front of a staircase that's tested positive for lead.Battle Against Lead: Trump Administration Bill Has Maine Property Owners Worried

Property owners and health advocates in Lewiston and Auburn are concerned about a bill before the U.S. Senate that they say could weaken regulations around lead poisoning.

 

 

Photo of stairs with deteriorating paint.

 

Too many kids are exposed to lead in these Maine towns

Many more Maine children are considered at high risk for lead poisoning under updated rules that are prompting an increase in home inspections.In September, Maine implemented new guidelines for lead exposure among children that conform with federal recommendations.

 

Picture of danger sign on door and stairs with chipping and peeling paint Maine CDC increasing inspections for lead

 

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention is increasing the number of inspections for homes that have lead in paint or fixtures.

 

New Lead Standard in Maine Means More Home Inspections

AUGUSTA, Maine - Maine is testing more homes for lead, following a federal recommendation aiming to stop lead exposure before children become sick.


HUD AWARDS $127 MILLION TO PROTECT CHILDREN AND FAMILIES FROM DANGEROUS LEAD AND OTHER HOME HAZARDS

WASHINGTON - In a continuous effort to keep families and their children safe from lead-based paint and other home health and safety hazards, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) today awarded more than $127 million to 48 state and local government agencies (see chart below).


Greg Payne and his daughter.New lead poisoning standards expose hotspots in Augusta, Hallowell and Gardiner

About a dozen years ago, a doctor told Greg Payne that his infant daughter had lead in her blood.

It was a rough awakening for Payne, who was then living in an 1860s farmhouse in Massachusetts. No amount of lead is considered safe, particularly for young children, but his daughter had 9 micrograms per deciliter in her blood – almost double the limit now advised by federal health authorities.


Nakeyja Cade with her year-old daughter Zariyah Cade in Flint, Mich., last March. The girl's blood had tested high for lead. A new study shows children with elevated blood-lead levels at age 11 ended up as adults with lower cognitive function than their parents. Washington Post photo by Linda DavidsonStudy shows brain damage from lead likely permanent

Children with elevated blood-lead levels at age 11 ended up as adults with lower cognitive function and lower-status occupations than their parents, according to research that offers one of the clearest looks yet at the potential long-term health impact of the potent neurotoxin.

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